Wild ENERGY

In the fight against human-induced climate change, we must protect wildlife and wild places. The Center envisions a society powered entirely by clean, equitable and sustainable wildlife-friendly energy that benefits all communities, human and wild.

Wildlife-friendly energy is energy generated near or at the point of consumption from technologies that impose little to no threat to wildlife throughout their lifecycle (e.g., distributed solar), as well as energy saved through improved efficiency, smarter markets and energy conservation.

WILD ENERGY CAMPAIGNS

SunFed

With the lack of clean energy leadership at the federal level, we need our state governments more than ever to lead by example and power their facilities with clean and wildlife-friendly energy.

Amazon Shine

Amazon is known for its cheap prices and fast delivery of books and thousands of other products to your door. But what you won't see in your shopping cart is the huge land and energy cost of the massive “fulfillment centers” where all those products await shipment.

Wild energy Champion Cities

The renewable energy revolution is happening in cities across the country and we're working with communities to ensure a truly just, wildlife-friendly energy system.

Take Action for Wildlife and Wild Places

Amazon Shine

Tell Amazon to shine with rooftop solar.

Go solar for wildlife.

Go solar for wildlife.

Bring Solar to Your State's Government Buildings

Latest Wild Energy News

Wild Energy Medium Posts
Wild Energy Medium Posts
Earth-friendly Energy Answers

Take simple carbon-saving steps to help save the environment and save on your utility bills.

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Wild Energy Medium Posts
Wild Energy Medium Posts
Eclipsing Rooftop Solar

The Center’s Throwing Shade report shines light on 10 sunny states blocking solar development through inadequate or destructive energy policies.

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Campaign Op-eds
Campaign Op-eds
Solar energy powers millions of green jobs

Energy is the lifeblood of our society. Uninterrupted streams of electrons power...

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Campaign Op-eds
Campaign Op-eds
Bill would block energy choices, independence in Wyoming

By blindly and desperately prohibiting utilities from generating electricity from clean and reliable energy sources, Wyoming legislators...

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Campaign Op-eds
Campaign Op-eds
Nothing Trumps a clean, equitable and wildlife-friendly energy future

When the fed fails, we need renewed clean-energy commitments from state and local governments.

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Press Releases
Press Releases
Florida Governor Signs Bipartisan Bill to Expand Solar Incentives
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Press Releases
Press Releases
Nevada Governor Signs Law to Restore Rooftop-solar Safeguards
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Press Releases
Press Releases
New Study: Americans Want to Use More Renewable Energy
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Wild Energy Gallery

Spectacled Eider

There are approximately 3,000 to 4,000 nesting pairs of spectacled eiders left in the United States. Fossil fuel extraction is pushing them out of their already-shrinking habitat.

Bowhead Whale

There are only 10,000 endangered bowhead whales left in the ocean. Oil and gas development off Alaska’s northern coast threatens the bowhead with potential oil spills, increased noise and deadly collisions with ships.

Graham's Penstemon

Graham’s penstemon occurs only on oil shale soils. Oil and gas grilling destroys this species’ habitat, permanently changing its home soil; in addition, individual flowers are trampled when their habitat is invaded.

Dunes Sagebrush Lizard

The dunes sagebrush lizard is found only in rare shinnery oak sand dune habitat in southeast New Mexico and western Texas. Disturbance from oil well pads, leaking pipelines and high concentrations of toxic hydrogen sulfide gas emitted from wells all contribute to its declining population.

Polar Bear

Polar bears use floating sea ice as a hunting platform, a resting place during long migrations, and a meeting spot for mating and other essential behaviors. Loss of sea ice due to human-induced climate change has led to the decline of this splendid species

Wildlife-friendly Energy Communities Map

This interactive map highlights the communities leading the way with wildlife-friendly energy programs. Urge your community to adopt new or expand existing wildlife-friendly energy programs and targets. If your city has made a commitment to renewable energy and isn’t on this map, please email us at wildenergy@biologicaldiversity.org.

Solarize Programs:

Solarize programs, which allow groups of families or businesses to “go solar” together, are a cost-effective approach to scale up residential solar deployment. This approach has become very popular owing to its ability to help reduce upfront costs and mitigate technical complexity, at the same time enhancing a group’s ability to negotiate a better rate and select a reputable installer.

Since the first solarize campaign in southeast Portland, Oregon, in 2009, there have been close to 200 solarize programs launched across the country.

Additional resources on solarize program development and implementation:

Wild energy Champion Cities:

A few years ago, meeting an entire community’s energy needs with renewable sources might’ve seemed like a pipe dream. But it’s already the energy reality in cities like Aspen, Colorado, Burlington, Vermont, and Greensburg, Kansas — which generate and/or purchase as much renewable energy or renewable energy credit as they consume. San Diego and Santa Monica are leading the way for other cities to set legally binding 100 percent renewable energy targets and “zero net energy” requirements respectively. Legislators in Massachusetts have proposed “An Act Transitioning Massachusetts to 100 Percent Renewable Energy,” a bill that would require all electricity consumption within the state’s borders to come from safe, efficient and pollution-free renewable energy by 2035, and that would phase out fossil fuels altogether by 2050.

So the renewable energy revolution is now here, happening in cities across the country. The next phase for a truly just, wildlife-friendly energy system is for communities to commit only to sources that impose little to no threat to the environment and its biodiversity.

In recognition of the vastly different environmental footprints among renewable energy technologies, we urge communities with existing 100-percent renewable energy targets to further their sustainability efforts by prioritizing wildlife-friendly energy sources, and for all communities to adopt 100-percent wildlife-friendly energy targets.

What Are People Saying About Wildlife-friendly Energy?

  • "The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise. That’s how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure — our forests and waterways, our croplands and snow-capped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared."

    President Obama, Second Inaugural Address, January 2013

  • “It’s unquestionable that a clear advantage of distributed generation solar is greater use of existing rooftops, parking lots, and other paved spaces, thus reducing the disturbance to wildlife.”

    Professor Kenneth Gillingham, Yale University

  • “While more and more people move to urban areas, our hearts stay close to wildlife and wild places. We stroll community parks, frequent hiking trails, treasure our national parks, and love pictures and videos of wildlife and wild places. A clean and sustainable energy future that preserves the health of wildlife and wild places demands our every effort.”

    Chad Tudenggongbu, Senior Renewable Energy Campaigner, Center for Biological Diversity

RESOURCES

Wild Energy Factsheet:

The transition to a wildlife-friendly energy future is not only possible as technology improves and costs drop — it’s absolutely necessary to curb climate change, protect endangered species and avoid other environmental consequences of fossil fuel development and consumption.

Throwing Shade:

This report analyzes and highlights the lacking and destructive distributed-solar policies in 10 states that account for more than 35 percent of the rooftop-solar potential in the contiguous United States, but only 6 percent of installed distributed solar capacity.

Go Solar for Wildlife:

By installing solar panels where you live or work, participating in a community solar project or advocating for solar-access rights, you’re supporting a wildlife-friendly, clean energy source.

Weatherize for Wildlife

Weatherize for Wildlife

Five easy tips to stay warm, slash your energy bills and save wildlife this winter.

MEET THE TEAM

Stephanie Feldstein

Stephanie Feldstein

Population and Sustainability Director

Greer Ryan

Greer Ryan

Renewable Energy and Research Specialist

Melissa Amarello

Melissa Amarello

Population and Sustainability Communications Associate

Sarah Baillie

Sarah Baillie

Condoms Coordinator

Jessica Herrera

Jessica Herrera

Media Specialist

Jennifer Molidor

Jennifer Molidor

Senior Food Campaigner

RELATED CAMPAIGNS

Keep It in the Ground

Ending new fossil fuel leasing on America's public lands and offshore areas would keep up to 450 billion tons of greenhouse gases from polluting our atmosphere.

The Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

The DRECP is an ambitious undertaking both to protect irreplaceable desert habitats, plants, animals and ecological processes and to allow for the development of a significant amount of renewable energy in areas where it will have the least ecological impact.

Population and Sustainability

A program of the Center for Biological Diversity addressing the connection between rampant human population growth, overconsumption, and the wildlife extinction crisis.

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